Tag For Love

Tag for Love: Addams Family Movie Plot Revolves Around Interior Design

Margaux Needler, villainess

Cohost J here. `I finally got around to seeing the latest Addams Family movie, because it’s one of my most favorite franchises ever (the first two live action movies from the 90s are in my top 5 list). Imagine my surprise and delight to see that the entire plot of the new The Addams Family movie centers around interior design and one overbearing interior designer/TV hostess! Margaux Needler, voiced by Allison Janney, is the host of Margaux’s Design Intervention, and she wants everything to be the same. In fact she’s trying to sell units in an entire town called Assimilation, New Jersey…except that the Addams clan doesn’t fit in.

She offers Morticia a free home makeover, and–spoiler alert–the house does wind up pink, but its evil spirit winds up shrugging off the Margaux-esque hue pretty quickly, and Morticia stands by her funeral home-Victorian style.

Margaux’s design intervention stops with her daughter Parker.

Tag for love on this iconic property hinging entirely on interior design! Can you tell who this villainess reminds us of, in her quest for every home to be the same style?

It is revealed that the Addams Family actually lives in Assimilation, NJ in an abandoned asylum.

Three snaps for a foiled design intervention!

Tag for Hate

Tag For Hate: Fire At Notre Dame

Photo: Wired.com

Cohost J here. I think anyone who has fallen in love with Paris is dying on the inside today. The images of Notre Dame cathedral in flames are heartbreaking. Though the worst-case scenario didn’t materialize and the firefighters were able to put out the blaze before permanent structural damage was done, this is still a punch in the gut.

I’ve been to Paris twice and went to Notre Dame both times–twice on my last trip in 2014. I took a Gothic architecture art history class in college (and almost changed my major because of it) and went gaga over the flying buttresses, the arches, the rose windows, and all the little details frozen in stone, including those famous rain spouts we call gargoyles. Despite the hordes of fellow tourists, once you step inside the doors and wander through its forest of columns, this feeling of wonder and peace settles over you–which is exactly the intention of its design. I am not into the church (lower nor upper case!) at all but the building still gives you that religious feeling, somehow. That bodily response to a cathedral is not unique to Notre Dame (I literally cried at Chartres cathedral’s blue stained glass–design nerd alert!) but ND is literally the heart of Paris. Geographically and spiritually. How far to Paris? The mileage is measured to Notre Dame’s front door. It’s kilometer zero. And as a visitor it can become the center of your memories too.

Up on the rooftop access tour, June 2014

 

A gargoyle’s view of the square.

Notre Dame is so much more than a church. It is more than brick, stone, glass and wood. It is architectural history in physical form. It’s an incomprehensibly collaborative art installation (and yes, it was built using exploitative practices and unholy money and yes I’m still not down with the organized religion thing) that spans the centuries. The wood, stone, glass and brick can be rebuilt–maybe add a little steel this time?

Photo: National Review.

After all, Notre Dame was not a static structure. It changed too, and the process of renovating and restoring it seem to be the likely source of this fire. The lovely super-ornate, majorly Gothic over-the-top (pun intended) spire which collapsed was a nineteenth century addition, after all. Fun fact: it’s a major blooper in Disney’s Hunchback of Notre Dame! Quasimodo dances around the roof and uses the spire like a stripper pole, but it would not have been there when the story was set!

That pole he’s working? Not there in 1482.

Anyway. They will rebuild. They were already in the process of reconstructing and preserving it. Designers and architects will combine wood and stone to create something magical. The fire is now part of Notre Dame’s long history. Hopefully what we remember is that buildings and artworks can awaken emotions in us, and they too can be lost. No one died in the fire, thankfully, but those who love that cathedral, for whatever reason, felt like we were watching a death unfold. Through design, our public places and houses–even houses where God lives–can feel like home, and we need to recognize and celebrate them in the now. Before our own history is history.