Tag For Love

Tag For Love: Hugs

Are you a hugger?

Do you wanna greet everyone with a great, big bear hug?

Or maybe you just like a quickie. You know–a quick hug before jetting out the door to work or quick hug for the hosts when you arrive at that party.

Better Homes and Gardens’ recent post confirms it: if you’re a hugger you’re probably happier and healthier.

Research by Carnegie Mellon finds that hugs can serve as a buffer from a bad day.

We agree. Hugs are amazeballs. So, go ahead and hug away. It’s good for you!

Tag for Hate · Tag For Love

Tag For Love/Hate: Gwyneth Paltrow

Let’s be honest. Most of us have a Love/Hate relationship with Gwyneth Paltrow. Academy Award winning acting. Life in the spotlight. Bougie children’s names. Incredibly fit in her forties. Signature lifestyle brand with the awful name. That whole “conscious uncoupling” thing. It’s often hard to know whether to Tag for Love or Tag for Hate.

Following her IG feeds (either her personal page or for her lifestyle brand GOOP) keeps you swimming in the conundrum.

Love? Hate? Love? Hate?

All sides of the eternal debate seem to coalesce in one recent IG post.

Gwyneth Paltrow, from her Instagram feed.
Oh, Gwyneth.

Announcing her new offices, Gwyneth stands in front of sleek, blonde-wood bookcases with leaning, lower shelves prefect for highlighting magazines, art, or favorite books. Showcase bookcases in the face of KonMari? Love! The shelves are sparsely filled, prompting her to request recommendations from followers on books on design, food, and corporate culture. Seeking fan input? Love!


That green jumper she’s wearing? Oh my goddesses. HATE!

Round and round it goes. Love? Hate? Love to Hate? Hate to Love? Oh, Gwyneth, you perplex us so. With no end in sight it seems best to just go ahead and employ a Tag for Love/Hate. It’s a mindfully selected compromise focused on equilibrium to reduce stress and help reach optimal wellness.
We’re sure it’s What Gwyneth Would Do.

Tag For Love

Prepping For The Kips Bay Decorator Show House

Oops, is that headline misleading? To be clear, we are NOT part of the 2019 Kips Bay Decorator Show House. As if! No, we just want to go–it’s the interior design event of the year. Images from the house pop up in the mags, mood boards and blogs all year long. Hopefully we can go this May.

The third floor study, pre-renovation.

The list of participating designers was announced today and it’s a mix of A-list designers and newcomers. CBB favorite Corey Damon Jenkins is one of them so congrats Corey!

We’re looking forward to some amazing lewks and over-the-top ideas.

One of 2018’s biggest, most photographed moments: the staircase by Sasha Bikoff. Photo from her website.

Are you planning on taking it in? (Phrasing, sorry!)

Tag For Love

Tag For Love: Globes

Today’s Tag is inspired by this post on Valetmag.com which makes the case for having a globe as part of your accessories/home decor arsenal.

They’re not only tools of inspiration but starters of conversation—have a few people over and someone will inevitably start spinning the globe.

Valetmag.com

Of course, since Valet is a men’s fashion/lifestyle site, they tout globes as “handsome, masculine object[s]” perfect for any mancave. We’d say they look good in anyone’s space, regardless of gender. They are right, though, that you can either drop lots of coin on a high-end version, score a vintage one online (or at your local flea market or antique store), or–an option they don’t cover–the school supply section at Target.

This shelfie has given us a case of shelf envy. Styling on point! Photo: Valetmag.com.

Cohost J. here: When I was a teenager, I was invited to my friend Molly’s big sister’s wedding, which was held in the garden of their parent’s amahzing Carpenter Gothic home. The couple eschewed a religious ceremony, and in lieu of an altar, they displayed a hand-painted globe that the groom gave to Jennifer, the bride. The oceans were white, the land masses black–it was striking, and obviously memorable. He used a regular ole globe and regular ole paint, and all it took was some time. So feel free to customize your own globe if you’re crafty (and if you don’t care about political borders).

It makes for a nice hands-on accessory and a reminder of our larger home, spinning as if by invisible hands.

Go for a spin with Globie from Pee Wee’s Playhouse.

Of course, there are some globes that come with their own hands, and if your decor runs in this direction, well, then…your last name might be Herman, or you fully embrace your whimsical side.

Tag For Love

Tag For Love: This Article About Regretting Open Concept Houses

Open floor concept living is not for everyone–either by choice or by architectural design. This recent Boston Globe article sums up a growing dissatisfaction with open concepts and their ubiquity in the real estate marketplace.

Photo: Home-Designing.com.

“Hashtag OpenConceptRemorse,” Partan-Tveteraas said, by way of explaining why they’re now spending thousands of dollars to put up new walls and are considering pricey sliding doors. Others get seduced by the fantasy of living in a pristine minimalist space — per every photo ever taken of an open concept home — only to forget that when your first floor is one room, there’s no place for clutter to hide.

BostonGlobe.com

Cohost J. here: We can’t give a Tag For Hate to open concepts, because in many spaces they work beautifully. Lots of people love the entertaining possibilities–heck, cohost Rob has an open concept first floor! What I love about this article is that it makes the case for actually thinking about your lifestyle and how your home enhances and supports that lifestyle. Homeowners interviewed by the reporter talk about how they could see themselves entertaining lavishly while whipping up three-course meals in the kitchen, or keeping an eye on the kids while busy doing something else. For most of us, these are fantasies. And while fantasy interior design has its place, you have to be really careful about making those dreams come true.

Even HGTV, the source that has inspired thousands of homeowners to toss sledgehammers into sheetrock with abandon, warns about the downsides of open concept living.

Sometimes you get what you wish for, and, to quote Sondheim’s Into The Woods: “Wishes come true, not free.” The tradeoffs of open concept? Lack of privacy. Clutter. A nagging sense that there are things still to be done in that other “room” over there that I can see while I’m trying to relax on the couch. Or, as homeowner Asya says in the piece, someone is relaxing and watching her while she’s working.

Photo: HGTV.ca

Friends of ours (frequently referenced in the show) have a 1970’s swinger’s house in Poughkeepsie–no joke. It’s a one bedroom, 3,000+ square foot three-level house. The only interior walls that extend to the ceiling are around the kitchen and bathrooms. It’s a great house for entertaining (and they do, frequently, and largely). But quiet and cozy it is not. It works for them and their lifestyle–it’s just the two of them and a dog–but it would be totally impractical for my family. And most families, which is probably why it sat on the market for four years, waiting for just the right buyers!

So as you’re househunting, fantasy or otherwise, or dreaming up ways to fix up your existing space, be honest with yourself and your family. Perform a lifestyle audit and really think about your tolerance for clutter, mess, cleaning, organizing, noise, and activity. Hash it all out internally before knocking down all those internal walls. Be open with yourself and those you live with before committing to open concept.

Tag for Hate

Tag For Hate: Time Changes

The Dali Melting Clock, available at Urban Outfitters

Cohost J. here. It’s Daylight Saving Time Monday here in New York, and it sucks. I feel hung over, even though I didn’t drink last night. It’s a three-coffee kind of day. Yes, yes, all our body clocks and circadian rhythms will adapt and catch up, but here in the worst of it, I can’t help thinking: Why? Why do we continue this pointless exercise?

Turns out, Daylight Saving Time wasn’t really created to help farmers during World War I (or whatever story you were told).

Contrary to popular belief, American farmers did not lobby for daylight saving to have more time to work in the fields; in fact, the agriculture industry was deeply opposed to the time switch when it was first implemented on March 31, 1918, as a wartime measure. The sun, not the clock, dictated farmers’ schedules, so daylight saving was very disruptive. Farmers had to wait an extra hour for dew to evaporate to harvest hay, hired hands worked less since they still left at the same time for dinner and cows weren’t ready to be milked an hour earlier to meet shipping schedules. Agrarian interests led the fight for the 1919 repeal of national daylight saving time, which passed after Congress voted to override President Woodrow Wilson’s veto. Rather than rural interests, it has been urban entities such as retail outlets and recreational businesses that have championed daylight saving over the decades. (Credit: History.com)

Also, it’s not really an energy-saver, either, as we tend to use more electricity to cool our homes later into the evening, thanks to our manipulation of the sunset time.

Those of us who are parents know that one big reason that DST sucks is that it’s hell on kids’ schedules. Our baby was up until almost 10:00 pm last night and naptime was all out of whack. Yes, he’ll adjust too. But again, why are we doing this?

TBH, the “melting clock” above also gets a Tag For Hate. Dali’s original painting: thumbs up. But this (and its clones in every Spencer Gifts since time immemorial) are completely unoriginal. Please don’t buy this.

Tag For Love

Tag For Love: Tulips

Cohost J. here. Set off by our recent #TagForLove for fresh flowers, I went in search of a little taste of springtime on a March day that began with 12-degree temperatures.

Not a pic from last spring but from March 7, 2019.

Luckily, Adams Fairacre Farms, a local high-end grocery store/garden center is having its annual Garden Show, and I had the chance to step inside after a lunch meeting. It warmed my heart, and my body, being in their huge greenhouse!

The best part? All those tulips (though it was all nice to see). Yep, my love for tulips endures (I got your back, PrettyPinkTulips, even if I don’t go for pink).

My garden does NOT look this lush.

We do what we can to make it through the winter. Those orange tulips are literally giving me LIFE.